UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Role of Optical Neuromonitoring in Neonatal Encephalopathy—Current State and Recent Advances

Harvey-Jones, K; Lange, F; Tachtsidis, I; Robertson, NJ; Mitra, S; (2021) Role of Optical Neuromonitoring in Neonatal Encephalopathy—Current State and Recent Advances. Frontiers in Pediatrics , 9 , Article 653676. 10.3389/fped.2021.653676. Green open access

[thumbnail of fped-09-653676.pdf]
Preview
Text
fped-09-653676.pdf - Published Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) in term and near-term infants is a significant global health problem; the worldwide burden of disease remains high despite the introduction of therapeutic hypothermia. Assessment of injury severity and effective management in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) relies on multiple monitoring modalities from systemic to brain-specific. Current neuromonitoring tools provide information utilized for seizure management, injury stratification, and prognostication, whilst systemic monitoring ensures multi-organ dysfunction is recognized early and supported wherever needed. The neuromonitoring technologies currently used in NE however, have limitations in either their availability during the active treatment window or their reliability to prognosticate and stratify injury confidently in the early period following insult. There is therefore a real need for a neuromonitoring tool that provides cot side, early and continuous monitoring of brain health which can reliably stratify injury severity, monitor response to current and emerging treatments, and prognosticate outcome. The clinical use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology has increased in recent years. Research studies within this population have also increased, alongside the development of both instrumentation and signal processing techniques. Increasing use of commercially available cerebral oximeters in the NICU, and the introduction of advanced optical measurements using broadband NIRS (BNIRS), frequency domain NIRS (FDNIRS), and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) have widened the scope by allowing the direct monitoring of oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow, both key to understanding pathophysiological changes and predicting outcome in NE. This review discusses the role of optical neuromonitoring in NE and why this modality may provide the next significant piece of the puzzle toward understanding the real time state of the injured newborn brain.

Type: Article
Title: Role of Optical Neuromonitoring in Neonatal Encephalopathy—Current State and Recent Advances
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fped.2021.653676
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2021.653676
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2021 Harvey-Jones, Lange, Tachtsidis, Robertson and Mitra. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: neonatal encephalopathy, Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE), newborn brain injury, neonatal neuromonitoring, NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy), cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation, cerebral metabolism, cerebral oxygenation
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Neonatology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10126332
Downloads since deposit
63Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item