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In vitro characterisation of low-cost synthetic meshes intended for hernia repair in the UK

Grillo, A; Hyder, Z; Mudera, V; Kureshi, A; (2021) In vitro characterisation of low-cost synthetic meshes intended for hernia repair in the UK. Hernia 10.1007/s10029-021-02401-z. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Purpose: Low-cost meshes (LCM) were repurposed for the repair of hernias in the developing world. In vivo studies have shown LCM to have comparable results to commercial meshes (CM) at a fraction of the cost. However, little has been done to characterise the mechanical and biocompatible properties of LCM, preventing its clinical use in the UK. The objectives of the research are to assess mechanical and ultrastructural properties of two UK-sourced low-cost meshes (LCM) and the characterisation of the LCMs in vitro biocompatibility. Methods: Mechanical properties of the two LCM were measured through uniaxial tensile test and ultrastructure was evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy. LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Assay kit and alamarBlue were used to assess cellular viability and proliferation, respectively. Images were acquired with a fluorescence microscope and analysed using ImageJ (NIH, USA). Results: LCM1 and LCM2 were both multifilament meshes, with the first having smaller pores than the latter. LCM1 exhibited significantly higher tensile strength (p < 0.05) than LCM2 but significantly lower extensibility (p < 0.0001), while Young’s Modulus of the two samples was not significantly different. No significant difference was found in the cellular viability and morphology cultured in LCM1 and LCM2 conditioned media. Metabolic assay and fluorescence imaging showed cellular attachment and proliferation on both LCMs over 14 days. Conclusion: The characterisation of the two UK-sourced LCMs showed in vitro biocompatibility and mechanical and ultrastructural properties comparable to the equivalent CM. This in vitro data represents a step forward for the feasibility of adopting LCM for surgical repair of hernias in the UK. ®

Type: Article
Title: In vitro characterisation of low-cost synthetic meshes intended for hernia repair in the UK
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s10029-021-02401-z
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10029-021-02401-z
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Hernia repair, Low-cost mesh, Biocompatibility, Mechanical tests
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10126072
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