UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Relationship between classic vascular risk factors and cumulative recurrent cardiovascular event burden in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease: Results from the UCC-SMART prospective cohort study

De Vries, TI; Westerink, J; Bots, ML; Asselbergs, FW; Smulders, YM; Visseren, FLJ; (2021) Relationship between classic vascular risk factors and cumulative recurrent cardiovascular event burden in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease: Results from the UCC-SMART prospective cohort study. BMJ Open , 11 (3) , Article e038881. 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-038881. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Asselbergs_Relationship between classic vascular risk factors and cumulative recurrent cardiovascular event burden in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease_VoR.pdf - Published version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective The aim of the current study was to assess the relationship between classic cardiovascular risk factors and risk of not only the first recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular event, but also the total number of non-fatal and fatal cardiovascular events in patients with recently clinically manifest cardiovascular disease (CVD). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care centre. Participants 7239 patients with a recent first manifestation of CVD from the prospective UCC-SMART (Utrecht Cardiovascular Cohort-Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease) cohort study. Outcome measures Total cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, stroke, vascular interventions, major limb events and cardiovascular mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 8.9 years, 1412 patients had one recurrent cardiovascular event, while 1290 patients had two or more recurrent events, with a total of 5457 cardiovascular events during follow-up. The HRs for the first recurrent event and cumulative event burden using Prentice-Williams-Peterson models, respectively, were 1.36 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.48) and 1.26 (95% CI 1.17 to 1.35) for smoking, 1.14 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.18) and 1.09 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.12) for non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and 1.05 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.07) and 1.04 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.06) for systolic blood pressure per 10 mm Hg. Conclusions In a cohort of patients with established CVD, systolic blood pressure, non-HDL cholesterol and current smoking are important risk factors for not only the first, but also subsequent recurrent events during follow-up. Recurrent event analysis captures the full cumulative burden of CVD in patients.

Type: Article
Title: Relationship between classic vascular risk factors and cumulative recurrent cardiovascular event burden in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease: Results from the UCC-SMART prospective cohort study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-038881
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-038881
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10125365
Downloads since deposit
4Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item