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The fabrication of novel, bespoke pharmaceutical dosage forms using 3D printing

Awad, Atheer; (2021) The fabrication of novel, bespoke pharmaceutical dosage forms using 3D printing. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London).

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Abstract

Most pharmaceutical manufacturing techniques are well suited for mass manufacturing but are wholly unsuitable for the manufacturing of tailored dosage forms, wherein they entail the use of inherently laborious, dose-inflexible and lengthy processes. This calls for the embracement of modern, innovative technologies, such as three-dimensional (3D) printing. 3D printing is an additive manufacturing technique that enables the production of bespoke objects of virtually any shape and size. The aim of this work was to investigate different 3D printing technologies for the fabrication of personalised dosage forms, providing contemporary solutions for persistent and existing pharmaceutical challenges. Selective laser sintering (SLS) 3D printing was used to create 3D printed multiparticulates (miniprintlets) with controlled release properties. Moreover, dual SLS 3D printing was employed for the fabrication of miniprintlets with two individual controllable systems that integrate different drugs. This offered a novel way for dispensing fixed-ratio multi-drug combinations suitable for dosing to different patient groups. SLS 3D printing was also employed to create 3D printed medications (printlets) specific for visually impaired patients. Orally disintegrating printlets with tactile patterns were fabricated, facilitating self-administration of medications and improving patient compliance. Subsequently, direct powder extrusion (DPE) 3D printing was used for the preparation of alcohol-resistant and abuse-deterrent printlets incorporating the opioid analgesic tramadol. Finally, 4D printing was applied for the fabrication of self-transforming, gastroretentive printlets. DPE 3D printing was found to offer a rapid, single-step and solvent-free system that enables the fabrication of oral dosage forms that transform and reside in the stomach region, reducing the frequency of medication intake and improving adherence to treatment plans. Overall, this work demonstrates the transformative potential of 3D printing within healthcare, wherein it could be integrated to complement current fabrication methods by expediting the development of dosage forms that are specific to certain patient groups or medical conditions.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: The fabrication of novel, bespoke pharmaceutical dosage forms using 3D printing
Event: University College London
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10124782
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