UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The evolution of altruism through war is highly sensitive to population structure and to civilian and fighter mortality

Dyble, M; (2021) The evolution of altruism through war is highly sensitive to population structure and to civilian and fighter mortality. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , 118 (11) , Article e2011142118. 10.1073/pnas.2011142118. Green open access

[thumbnail of 2020-11142RR_Merged_PDF.pdf]
Preview
Text
2020-11142RR_Merged_PDF.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Many evolutionary theorists have suggested that the human capacity for altruism was forged in war, with cohesive and altruistic groups outcompeting their selfish neighbors. Assessing this “parochial altruism” hypothesis relies largely on computational modeling. Here, I reexamine a well-known model that explores the coevolution of altruism and war. As well as clarifying the importance of factors such as the lethality of war to fighters and civilians, the results show that the evolution of altruism in this model relies on a degree of genetic differentiation between groups that exceeds that seen among hunter-gatherers. Furthermore, when the model produces a more realistic population structure, altruism does not evolve, casting doubt on the plausibility of the parochial altruism hypothesis.

Type: Article
Title: The evolution of altruism through war is highly sensitive to population structure and to civilian and fighter mortality
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2011142118
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2011142118
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Anthropology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10123741
Downloads since deposit
15Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item