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Elevated serum IL-10 is associated with severity of neonatal encephalopathy and adverse early childhood outcomes

Pang, R; Mujuni, BM; Martinello, KA; Webb, EL; Nalwoga, A; Ssekyewa, J; Musoke, M; ... Tann, CJ; + view all (2021) Elevated serum IL-10 is associated with severity of neonatal encephalopathy and adverse early childhood outcomes. Pediatric Research 10.1038/s41390-021-01438-1. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) contributes substantially to child mortality and disability globally. We compared cytokine profiles in term Ugandan neonates with and without NE, with and without perinatal infection or inflammation and identified biomarkers predicting neonatal and early childhood outcomes. METHODS: In this exploratory biomarker study, serum IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNFα, and VEGF (<12 h) were compared between NE and non-NE infants with and without perinatal infection/inflammation. Neonatal (severity of NE, mortality) and early childhood (death or neurodevelopmental impairment to 2.5 years) outcomes were assessed. Predictors of outcomes were explored with multivariable linear and logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic analyses. RESULTS: Cytokine assays on 159 NE and 157 non-NE infants were performed; data on early childhood outcomes were available for 150 and 129, respectively. NE infants had higher IL-10 (p < 0.001), higher IL-6 (p < 0.017), and lower VEGF (p < 0.001) levels. Moderate and severe NE was associated with higher IL-10 levels compared to non-NE infants (p < 0.001). Elevated IL-1α was associated with perinatal infection/inflammation (p = 0.013). Among NE infants, IL-10 predicted neonatal mortality (p = 0.01) and adverse early childhood outcome (adjusted OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.35-3.86, p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support a potential role for IL-10 as a biomarker for adverse outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy. IMPACT: Neonatal encephalopathy is a common cause of child death and disability globally. Inflammatory cytokines are potential biomarkers of encephalopathy severity and outcome. In this Ugandan health facility-based cohort, neonatal encephalopathy was associated with elevated serum IL-10 and IL-6, and reduced VEGF at birth. Elevated serum IL-10 within 12 h after birth predicted severity of neonatal encephalopathy, neonatal mortality, and adverse early childhood developmental outcomes, independent of perinatal infection or inflammation, and provides evidence to the contribution of the inflammatory processes. Our findings support a role for IL-10 as a biomarker for adverse outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy in a sub-Saharan African cohort.

Type: Article
Title: Elevated serum IL-10 is associated with severity of neonatal encephalopathy and adverse early childhood outcomes
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41390-021-01438-1
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-021-01438-1
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Neonatology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10123652
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