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Long-term renal function in children with Wilms Tumour and constitutional WT1 pathogenic variant

Falcone, MP; Pritchard-Jones, K; Brok, J; Mifsud, W; Williams, R; Nakata, K; Tugnait, S; ... Chowdhury, T; + view all (2022) Long-term renal function in children with Wilms Tumour and constitutional WT1 pathogenic variant. Pediatric Nephrology , 37 (4) 821 -832. 10.1007/s00467-021-05125-5. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Wilms tumour (WT) survivors, especially patients with associated syndromes or genitourinary anomalies due to constitutional WT1 pathogenic variant, have increased risk of kidney failure. We describe the long-term kidney function in children with WT and WT1 pathogenic variant to inform the surgical strategy and oncological management of such complex children. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients with WT and constitutional WT1 pathogenic variant treated at a single centre between 1993 and 2016, reviewing genotype, phenotype, tumour histology, laterality, treatment, patient survival, and kidney outcome. RESULTS: We identified 25 patients (60% male, median age at diagnosis 14 months, range 4–74 months) with WT1 deletion (4), missense (2), nonsense (8), frameshift (7), or splice site (4) pathogenic variant. Thirteen (52%) had bilateral disease, 3 (12%) had WT-aniridia, 1 had incomplete Denys-Drash syndrome, 11 (44%) had genitourinary malformation, and 10 (40%) had no phenotypic anomalies. Patient survival was 100% and 3 patients were in remission after relapse at median follow-up of 9 years. Seven patients (28%) commenced chronic dialysis of which 3 were after bilateral nephrectomies. The overall kidney survival for this cohort as mean time to start of dialysis was 13.38 years (95% CI: 10.3–16.4), where 7 patients experienced kidney failure at a median of 5.6 years. All of these 7 patients were subsequently transplanted. In addition, 2 patients have stage III and stage IV chronic kidney disease and 12 patients have albuminuria and/or treatment with ACE inhibitors. Four patients (3 frameshift; 1 WT1 deletion) had normal blood pressure and kidney function without proteinuria at follow-up from 1.5 to 12 years. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the known high risk of kidney disease in patients with WT and constitutional WT1 pathogenic variant, nearly two-thirds of patients had sustained native kidney function, suggesting that nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) should be attempted when possible without compromising oncological risk. Larger international studies are needed for accurate assessment of WT1genotype-kidney function phenotype correlation.

Type: Article
Title: Long-term renal function in children with Wilms Tumour and constitutional WT1 pathogenic variant
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00467-021-05125-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-021-05125-5
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Wilms tumour, WT1 pathogenic variant, Kidney function
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10122965
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