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Roles of Cognitive and Sociopsychological Individual Differences in Second Language Pronunciation Development in Classroom Settings: A Dynamic Systems Theory Approach

Suzukida, Yui; (2021) Roles of Cognitive and Sociopsychological Individual Differences in Second Language Pronunciation Development in Classroom Settings: A Dynamic Systems Theory Approach. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London).

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Abstract

Drawing on the framework of Dynamic Systems Theory that affords a holistic approach to understand the language development, the current study conducted a cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of how 51 Japanese learners of English with various experiential, cognitive and sociopsychological profiles differentially attained two different aspects of L2 pronunciation (comprehensibility, accentedness) in foreign language classroom settings. The participants engaged in four weeks of explicit pronunciation instruction. Their extemporaneous speech was collected via a picture description task at the beginning and end of the project. Subsequently, the pre- and post-test samples were rated for accentedness and comprehensibility, and then linked to a range of individual differences (IDs) factors including aptitude, motivation, anxiety, and English learning experience specific to L2 pronunciation development. At the outset of the project, the cross-sectional results suggested (a) three types of IDs examined in the current thesis were relatively independent from each other, and (b) recent L2 learning outside the classroom and anxiety levels were the strong predictors of both comprehensibility and accentedness, whereas and phonemic coding ability was uniquely linked to accentedness. Concerning the improvement in comprehensibility and accentedness after the intervention, the result of longitudinal study demonstrated the overall effectiveness of pronunciation instruction. However, no IDs showed interaction effect on the effectiveness of pronunciation instruction. Based on the findings, I discuss L2 pronunciation learning as a multifaceted, dynamic and ever-changing system as a result of complex interactions between multiple ID factors and pronunciation dimensions.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Roles of Cognitive and Sociopsychological Individual Differences in Second Language Pronunciation Development in Classroom Settings: A Dynamic Systems Theory Approach
Event: University College London
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
Keywords: Individual Differences, Pronunciation learning, Dynamic Systems Theory, Second Language Aquisition, Pronunciation Teaching, Comprehensibility
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10122329
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