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Alcohol Consumption and Incident Cataract Surgery in Two Large UK Cohorts

Chua, SY; Luben, RN; Hayat, S; Broadway, DC; Khaw, K-T; Warwick, A; Britten, A; ... UK Biobank Eye and Vision Consortium, ; + view all (2021) Alcohol Consumption and Incident Cataract Surgery in Two Large UK Cohorts. Ophthalmology 10.1016/j.ophtha.2021.02.007. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine the association of alcohol consumption and type of alcoholic beverage with incident cataract surgery in two large cohorts. DESIGN: Longitudinal observational study PARTICIPANTS: We included 469,387 participants of UK Biobank with a mean age of 56 years, and 23,162 participants of EPIC-Norfolk with a mean age of 59 years. METHODS: Self-reported alcohol consumption at baseline was ascertained by a touchscreen questionnaire in UK Biobank and a food-frequency questionnaire in EPIC-Norfolk. Cases were defined as participants undergoing cataract surgery in either eye as ascertained via data linkage to National Health Service procedure statistics. We excluded participants with cataract surgery up to 1 year after the baseline assessment visit or those with self-reported cataract at baseline. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the associations of alcohol consumption with incident cataract surgery, adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, Townsend deprivation index, body mass index, smoking and diabetes status. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incident cataract surgery RESULTS: There were 19,011 (mean cohort follow-up of 95 months) and 4,573 (mean cohort follow-up of 193 months) incident cases of cataract surgery in UK Biobank and EPIC-Norfolk, respectively. Compared to non-drinkers, drinkers were less likely to undergo cataract surgery in UK Biobank (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85-0.93) and EPIC-Norfolk (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.97) after adjusting for covariables. Among alcohol consumers, greater alcohol consumption was associated with a reduced risk of undergoing cataract surgery in EPIC-Norfolk (P<0.001), while a U-shaped association was observed in the UK Biobank. Compared with non-drinkers, sub-group analysis by type of alcohol beverage showed the strongest protective association with wine consumption; the risk of incident cataract surgery was 23% and 14% lower among those in the highest category of wine consumption in EPIC-Norfolk and UK Biobank, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a lower risk of undergoing cataract surgery with low to moderate alcohol consumption. The association was particularly apparent with wine consumption. We cannot exclude the possibility of residual confounding and further studies are required to determine whether this association is causal in nature.

Type: Article
Title: Alcohol Consumption and Incident Cataract Surgery in Two Large UK Cohorts
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2021.02.007
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2021.02.007
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article published under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Alcohol, Cataract, Cataract surgery, EPIC-Norfolk, Longitudinal observational cohort, UK Biobank, Wine
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10121905
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