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Cigarette Smoking and Minority Stress Across Age Cohorts in a National Sample of Sexual Minorities: Results From the Generations Study

Gordon, AR; Fish, JN; Kiekens, WJ; Lightfoot, M; Frost, DM; Russell, ST; (2020) Cigarette Smoking and Minority Stress Across Age Cohorts in a National Sample of Sexual Minorities: Results From the Generations Study. Annals of Behavioral Medicine 10.1093/abm/kaaa079. (In press).

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sexual minority populations in the United States have persistently higher rates of cigarette use than heterosexuals, partially driven by exposure to minority stressors (e.g., discrimination and victimization). Little is known about cigarette use across cohorts of sexual minority adults who came of age in distinctly different sociopolitical environments. PURPOSE: To examine cigarette use and minority stressors across three age cohorts of U.S. sexual minority adults. METHODS: We used data from the Generations Study, a nationally representative sample (N = 1,500) of White, Black, and Latino/a sexual minority adults in three age cohorts (younger: 18-25 years; middle: 34-41 years; and older: 52-59 years). Survey data were collected from March 2016 to March 2017. We used sex-stratified logistic regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between age cohort, minority stressors (discrimination and victimization), and two indicators of cigarette smoking (lifetime use and current use). RESULTS: Prevalence of current cigarette use in each age cohort was high (younger: 20%; middle: 33%; and older: 29%). Relative to the younger cohort, men and women in the middle- and older-age cohorts had significantly higher odds of lifetime and current smoking (e.g., men, current, aOR [95% CI]: middle = 2.47 [1.34, 4.52], older = 2.85 [1.66, 4.93]). Minority stressors were independently associated with higher odds of current smoking; when victimization was included, the magnitude of the association between age cohort and current smoking was diminished but remained significant. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking cessation interventions must consider the role of minority stress and the unique needs of sexual minority people across the life course.

Type: Article
Title: Cigarette Smoking and Minority Stress Across Age Cohorts in a National Sample of Sexual Minorities: Results From the Generations Study
Location: England
DOI: 10.1093/abm/kaaa079
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/abm/kaaa079
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Cigarette use, LGB, Minority stress, Sexual minority, Tobacco
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10121822
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