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(Sub)stellar companions shape the winds of evolved stars

Decin, L; Montarges, M; Richards, AMS; Gottlieb, CA; Homan, W; McDonald, I; El Mellah, I; ... Yates, J; + view all (2020) (Sub)stellar companions shape the winds of evolved stars. Science , 369 (6510) pp. 1497-1500. 10.1126/science.abb1229. Green open access

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Abstract

Binary interactions dominate the evolution of massive stars, but their role is less clear for low- and intermediate-mass stars. The evolution of a spherical wind from an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star into a nonspherical planetary nebula (PN) could be due to binary interactions. We observed a sample of AGB stars with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and found that their winds exhibit distinct nonspherical geometries with morphological similarities to planetary nebulae (PNe). We infer that the same physics shapes both AGB winds and PNe; additionally, the morphology and AGB mass-loss rate are correlated. These characteristics can be explained by binary interaction. We propose an evolutionary scenario for AGB morphologies that is consistent with observed phenomena in AGB stars and PNe.

Type: Article
Title: (Sub)stellar companions shape the winds of evolved stars
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1126/science.abb1229
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abb1229
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10121618
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