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The role of ICT in supporting the academic and social development of pupils with educational behavioural problems within primary schools in England

Ciftci, Abdullah; (2021) The role of ICT in supporting the academic and social development of pupils with educational behavioural problems within primary schools in England. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London).

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Abstract

This study’s aim is to understand teachers’ use of technology in their daily classroom activities and offer an in-depth and critical look at the role of technology within this context. The study is centred on the education of pupils with SEND and behavioural problems, their academic and social skills development, collaboration with peers, and the overarching concept of effective teaching and learning. Teachers’ accounts of everyday classroom use of technology is being explored to build a theoretical, pedagogical, and practical understanding of educational practice that involves technology as an intrinsic component of the classroom. As technology continues to evolve, educational praxis and pedagogy change alongside it; it is therefore important to explore what the role of technology is, as reported by practitioners in mainstream schools within an intensive and particularly challenging urban context. In this mixed-methods study, 140 primary school teachers (primarily from Greater London, UK) participated in a survey and 12 practitioners (7 teachers and 5 Special Educational Needs Co-ordinators [SENCOs]) from primary schools were interviewed. A blended analytical approach was taken in the analyses of the datasets. Analyses of the data centred on the systematic mapping of participants’ views in relation to technology’s affordances, collaborative learning and effective teaching. Participants showed awareness about the need for self-regulation for maximising educational gains with ICT-based education; they also demonstrated awareness about the particular needs of pupils with behavioural problems particularly regarding self-regulated learning. ICT was accepted as a force for good as well as bad as teachers argued that pupils were distracted, and at the same time they were engaged with the same tools. They, therefore, found adult guidance a necessity to make sure that pupils use ICT in appropriate ways. There was positivity towards ICT among participants, but they did not necessarily feel that they used ICT effectively for their teaching practices. The multimodality nature of ICT is very prevalent in the pedagogy of teachers as teachers use a plethora of digital resources such as websites that provide videos, slides, games and graphics for particular topics. Collaborative activities were mostly limited to creating supportive materials (e.g. slides and presentations), so collaboration that supports problem-solving skills and the development of metacognitive skills was reported as typically absent. Teachers need support in order to integrate a pedagogy that supports pupils to become independent learners. This is likely to be dependent on increasing awareness towards supporting self-regulating skills. This work brings a number of tangible as well as 'intermediate technology' notions such as ease of access, speed, connectivity, flexibility, multimodality, interactivity, remote control, online a/synchronous presentation, and the feeling of newness together as critical components the interweaving of which shapes effective pedagogy using ICT.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: The role of ICT in supporting the academic and social development of pupils with educational behavioural problems within primary schools in England
Event: UCL (University College London)
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10121268
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