UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Carriage Dynamics of Pneumococcal Serotypes in Naturally Colonized Infants in a Rural African Setting During the First Year of Life

Chaguza, C; Senghore, M; Bojang, E; Lo, SW; Ebruke, C; Gladstone, RA; Tientcheu, P-E; ... Kwambana-Adams, BA; + view all (2021) Carriage Dynamics of Pneumococcal Serotypes in Naturally Colonized Infants in a Rural African Setting During the First Year of Life. Frontiers in Pediatrics , 8 , Article 587730. 10.3389/fped.2020.587730. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
fped-08-587730.pdf - Published version

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) carriage precedes invasive disease and influences population-wide strain dynamics, but limited data exist on temporal carriage patterns of serotypes due to the prohibitive costs of longitudinal studies. Here, we report carriage prevalence, clearance and acquisition rates of pneumococcal serotypes sampled from newborn infants bi-weekly from weeks 1 to 27, and then bi-monthly from weeks 35 to 52 in the Gambia. We used sweep latex agglutination and whole genome sequencing to serotype the isolates. We show rapid pneumococcal acquisition with nearly 31% of the infants colonized by the end of first week after birth and quickly exceeding 95% after 2 months. Co-colonization with multiple serotypes was consistently observed in over 40% of the infants at each sampling point during the first year of life. Overall, the mean acquisition time and carriage duration regardless of serotype was 38 and 24 days, respectively, but varied considerably between serotypes comparable to observations from other regions. Our data will inform disease prevention and control measures including providing baseline data for parameterising infectious disease mathematical models including those assessing the impact of clinical interventions such as pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

Type: Article
Title: Carriage Dynamics of Pneumococcal Serotypes in Naturally Colonized Infants in a Rural African Setting During the First Year of Life
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fped.2020.587730
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.587730
Language: English
Additional information: © 2021 Chaguza, Senghore, Bojang, Lo, Ebruke, Gladstone, Tientcheu, Bancroft, Worwui, Foster-Nyarko, Ceesay, Okoi, McGee, Klugman, Breiman, Barer, Adegbola, Antonio, Bentley and Kwambana-Adams. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10120481
Downloads since deposit
5Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item