UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Declines in Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis in the Republic of Benin Following Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine: Epidemiological and Etiological Findings, 2011-2016

Agossou, J; Ebruke, C; Noudamadjo, A; Adedemy, JD; Denon, EY; Bankole, HS; Dogo, MA; ... Antonio, M; + view all (2019) Declines in Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis in the Republic of Benin Following Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine: Epidemiological and Etiological Findings, 2011-2016. Clinical Infectious Diseases , 69 S140-S147. 10.1093/cid/ciz478. Green open access

[thumbnail of ciz478.pdf]
Preview
Text
ciz478.pdf - Published Version

Download (917kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Pediatric bacterial meningitis (PBM) remains an important cause of disease in children in Africa. We describe findings from sentinel site bacterial meningitis surveillance in children <5 years of age in the Republic of Benin, 2011–2016. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from children admitted to Parakou, Natitingou, and Tanguieta sentinel hospitals with suspected meningitis. Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) was performed by rapid diagnostic tests, microbiological culture, and/or polymerase chain reaction; where possible, serotyping/grouping was performed. Results. A total of 10 919 suspected cases of meningitis were admitted to the sentinel hospitals. Most patients were 0–11 months old (4863 [44.5%]) and there were 542 (5.0%) in-hospital deaths. Overall, 4168 CSF samples were screened for pathogens and a total of 194 (4.7%) PBM cases were confirmed, predominantly caused by pneumococcus (98 [50.5%]). Following pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) introduction in 2011, annual suspected meningitis cases and deaths (case fatality rate) progressively declined from 2534 to 1359 and from 164 (6.5%) to 14 (1.0%) in 2012 and 2016, respectively (P < .001). Additionally, there was a gradual decline in the proportion of meningitis cases caused by pneumococcus, from 77.3% (17/22) in 2011 to 32.4% (11/34) in 2016 (odds ratio, 7.11 [95% confidence interval, 2.08–24.30]). Haemophilus influenzae meningitis fluctuated over the surveillance period and was the predominant pathogen (16/34 [47.1%]) by 2016. Conclusions: The observed decrease in pneumococcal meningitis after PCV introduction may be indicative of changing patterns of PBM etiology in Benin. Maintaining vigilant and effective surveillance is critical for understanding these changes and their wider public health implications.

Type: Article
Title: Declines in Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis in the Republic of Benin Following Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine: Epidemiological and Etiological Findings, 2011-2016
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/cid/ciz478
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz478
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Benin, pediatric, bacterial meningitis, pneumococcus, vaccines, INFLUENZAE-TYPE-B, PNEUMONIAE SEROTYPE 12F, STREPTOCOCCUS-PNEUMONIAE, CHILDREN YOUNGER, HIB DISEASE, SEQUELAE, BURDEN, GAMBIA, IMMUNIZATION, ELIMINATION
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10120465
Downloads since deposit
36Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item