UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Prevalence of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) and Antimicrobial Resistance in Community-Acquired Clinical Staphylococcus aureus in an Urban Gambian Hospital: A 11-Year Period Retrospective Pilot Study

Darboe, S; Dobreniecki, S; Jarju, S; Jallow, M; Mohammed, NI; Wathuo, M; Ceesay, B; ... Secka, O; + view all (2019) Prevalence of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) and Antimicrobial Resistance in Community-Acquired Clinical Staphylococcus aureus in an Urban Gambian Hospital: A 11-Year Period Retrospective Pilot Study. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology , 9 , Article 170. 10.3389/fcimb.2019.00170. Green open access

[thumbnail of fcimb-09-00170.pdf]
Preview
Text
fcimb-09-00170.pdf - Published Version

Download (846kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a virulence factor produced by some strains that causes leukocyte lysis and tissue necrosis. PVL-associated S. aureus (PVL-SA) predominantly causes skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) but can also cause invasive infections such as necrotizing pneumonia. It is carried by both community-associated methicillin susceptible S. aureus (CA-MSSA) and methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA). This study aims to determine the prevalence of PVL-SA among patients seen at an urban Gambian hospital and associated antibiotic resistance. / Methods: Archived clinical S. aureus (70 invasive bacteraemia and 223 non-invasive SSTIs) from 293 patients were retrieved as well as relevant data from clinical records where available. Antibiotic susceptibility was assessed using disc diffusion according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Genomic DNA was extracted and the presence of lukF and lukS PVL genes was detected by conventional gel-based PCR. / Result: PVL-SA strains accounted for 61.4% (180/293) of S. aureus isolates. PVL prevalence was high in both Gambian bacteraemia and SSTIs S. aureus strains. Antimicrobial resistance was low and included chloramphenicol (4.8%), cefoxitin (2.4%), ciprofloxacin (3.8%), erythromycin (8.9%), gentamicin (5.5%) penicillin (92.5%), tetracycline (41.0%), and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (24.2%). There was no association of PVL with antimicrobial resistance. / Conclusion: PVL expression is high among clinical S. aureus strains among Gambian patients. Reporting of PVL-SA clinical infections is necessary to enable the monitoring of the clinical impact of these strains in the population and guide prevention of the spread of virulent PVL-positive CA-MRSA strains.

Type: Article
Title: Prevalence of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) and Antimicrobial Resistance in Community-Acquired Clinical Staphylococcus aureus in an Urban Gambian Hospital: A 11-Year Period Retrospective Pilot Study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fcimb.2019.00170
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2019.00170
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2019 Darboe, Dobreniecki, Jarju, Jallow, Mohammed, Wathuo, Ceesay, Tweed, Basu Roy, Okomo, Kwambana-Adams, Antonio, Bradbury, de Silva, Forrest, Roca, Lawal, Nwakanma and Secka. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: Panton-Valentine leukocidin, Staphylococcus aureus, community-acquired, antimicrobial resistance, The Gambia
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10120454
Downloads since deposit
28Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item