UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Feasibility study of hospital antimicrobial stewardship analytics using electronic health records

Dutey-Magni, P; Gill, MJ; Mcnulty, D; Sohal, G; Hayward, A; Shallcross, L; (2021) Feasibility study of hospital antimicrobial stewardship analytics using electronic health records. JAC-Antimicrobial Resistance , 3 (1) , Article dlab018. 10.1093/jacamr/dlab018. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Dutey-Magni_dlab018.pdf - Published version

Download (469kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Hospital antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes are multidisciplinary initiatives to optimise the use of antimicrobials. Most hospitals depend on time-consuming manual audits to monitor clinicians’ prescribing. But much of the information needed could be sourced from electronic health records (EHRs). Objectives: To develop an informatics methodology to analyse characteristics of hospital AMS practice using routine electronic prescribing and laboratory records. Methods: Feasibility study using electronic prescribing, laboratory and clinical coding records from adult patients admitted to six specialties at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK (September 2017–August 2018). The study involved: (1) a review of antimicrobial stewardship standards of care; (2) their translation into concepts measurable from commonly available EHRs; (3) pilot application in an EHR cohort study (n=61,679 admissions). Results: We developed data modelling methods to characterise the use of antimicrobials (antimicrobial therapy episode linkage methods, therapy table, therapy changes). Prescriptions were linked into antimicrobial therapy episodes (mean 2.4 prescriptions/episode; mean length of therapy of 5.8 days) enabling production of several actionable findings. For example, 22% of therapy episodes for low-severity community acquired pneumonia were congruent with prescribing guidelines, with a tendency to use antibiotics with a broader spectrum. Analysis of therapy changes revealed a delay in switching from intravenous to oral therapy by an average 3.6 days [95% CI: 3.4; 3.7]. Performance of microbial cultures prior to treatment initiation occurred in just 22% of antibacterial prescriptions. The proposed methods enabled fine-grained monitoring of AMS practice all the way down to specialties, wards, and individual clinical teams by case mix, enabling more meaningful peer comparison. Conclusions: It is feasible to use hospital EHRs to construct rapid, meaningful measures of prescribing quality with potential to support quality improvement interventions (audit/feedback to prescribers), engagement with front-line clinicians on optimising prescribing, and AMS impact evaluation studies.

Type: Article
Title: Feasibility study of hospital antimicrobial stewardship analytics using electronic health records
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/jacamr/dlab018
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/jacamr/dlab018
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10120197
Downloads since deposit
4Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item