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Inhibition of Aurora Kinase B activity disrupts development and differentiation of salivary glands

Shaalan, AK; Teshima, THN; Tucker, AS; Proctor, GB; (2021) Inhibition of Aurora Kinase B activity disrupts development and differentiation of salivary glands. Cell Death Discovery , 7 , Article 16. 10.1038/s41420-020-00393-w. Green open access

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Abstract

Little is known about the key molecules that regulate cell division during organogenesis. Here we determine the role of the cell cycle promoter aurora kinase B (AURKB) during development, using embryonic salivary glands (E-SGs) as a model. AURKB is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates key events in mitosis, which makes it an attractive target for tailored anticancer therapy. Many reports have elaborated on the role of AURKB in neoplasia and cancer; however, no previous study has shown its role during organ development. Our previous experiments have highlighted the essential requirement for AURKB during adult exocrine regeneration. To investigate if AURKB is similarly required for progression during embryonic development, we pharmacologically inhibited AURKB in developing submandibular glands (SMGs) at embryonic day (E)13.5 and E16.5, using the highly potent and selective drug Barasertib. Inhibition of AURKB interfered with the expansion of the embryonic buds. Interestingly, this effect on SMG development was also seen when the mature explants (E16.5) were incubated for 24 h with another cell cycle inhibitor Aphidicolin. Barasertib prompted apoptosis, DNA damage and senescence, the markers of which (cleaved caspase 3, γH2AX, SA-βgal and p21, respectively), were predominantly seen in the developing buds. In addition to a reduction in cell cycling and proliferation of the epithelial cells in response to AURKB inhibition, Barasertib treatment led to an excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that resulted in downregulation of the acinar differentiation marker Mist1. Importantly, inhibition of ROS was able to rescue this loss of identity, with Mist1 expression maintained despite loss of AURKB. Together, these data identify AURKB as a key molecule in supporting embryonic development and differentiation, while inhibiting senescence-inducing signals during organogenesis.

Type: Article
Title: Inhibition of Aurora Kinase B activity disrupts development and differentiation of salivary glands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41420-020-00393-w
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41420-020-00393-w
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10120183
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