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Estimating the Associations between Big Five Personality Traits, Testosterone, and Cortisol

Sundin, ZW; Chopik, WJ; Welker, KM; Ascigil, E; Brandes, CM; Chin, K; Ketay, S; ... Tackett, JL; + view all (2021) Estimating the Associations between Big Five Personality Traits, Testosterone, and Cortisol. Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology 10.1007/s40750-020-00159-9. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hormones are often conceptualized as biological markers of individual differences and have been associated with a variety of behavioral indicators and characteristics, such as mating behavior or acquiring and maintaining dominance. However, before researchers create strong theoretical models for how hormones modulate individual and social behavior, information on how hormones are associated with dominant models of personality is needed. Although there have been some studies attempting to quantify the associations between personality traits, testosterone, and cortisol, there are many inconsistencies across these studies. METHODS: In this registered report, we examined associations between testosterone, cortisol, and Big Five personality traits. We aggregated 25 separate samples to yield a single sample of 3964 (50.3% women; 27.7% of women were on hormonal contraceptives). Participants completed measures of personality and provided saliva samples for testosterone and cortisol assays. RESULTS: The results from multi-level models and meta-analyses revealed mostly weak, non-significant associations between testosterone or cortisol and personality traits. The few significant effects were still very small in magnitude (e.g., testosterone and conscientiousness: r = −0.05). A series of moderation tests revealed that hormone-personality associations were mostly similar in men and women, those using hormonal contraceptives or not, and regardless of the interaction between testosterone and cortisol (i.e., a variant of the dual-hormone hypothesis). CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, we did not detect many robust associations between Big Five personality traits and testosterone or cortisol. The findings are discussed in the context of biological models of personality and the utility of examining heterogeneity in hormone-personality associations.

Type: Article
Title: Estimating the Associations between Big Five Personality Traits, Testosterone, and Cortisol
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s40750-020-00159-9
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40750-020-00159-9
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: Personality, Testosterone, Cortisol, Dual-hormone hypothesis, Registered report
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Experimental Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10119684
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