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Voice banking for people living with motor neurone disease: Views and expectations

Cave, R; Bloch, S; (2021) Voice banking for people living with motor neurone disease: Views and expectations. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders , 56 (1) pp. 116-129. 10.1111/1460-6984.12588.

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Abstract

Background: More than 80% of people living with MND (plwMND) develop difficulties with their speech, affecting communication, self‐identity and quality of life. Most plwMND eventually use an augmentative and alternative communication device (AAC) to communicate. Some AAC devices provide a synthesized voice for speech, however these voices are often viewed as impersonal and a factor in AAC acceptance. Voice banking creates an approximation of the person's own voice that can be used in AAC and is argued to go some way to preserve a person's identity when natural voice is lost, but there has been little supporting research. Aims: To understand what plwMND consider when deciding whether or not to bank their voice, what their expectations are, and the expectations of significant communication partners. Methods: Semi‐structured interviews were undertaken with plwMND who had either decided to bank their voice or had decided not to. Thematic analysis was used to provide a qualitative analysis of the data. Procedures Participants were an opportunistic sample of plwMND within England recruited via an open advert distributed by the MND Association (MNDA). Outcomes and Results: Twelve plwMND were interviewed with nine significant others. Nine participants had decided to bank their voice and three decided not to. The data suggest ‘preserving identity’ is the overarching motivation in decision making for voice banking. Participants who decided to voice bank considered it would help to maintain their identity and preserve their social and work networks. Participants deciding not to bank their voice highlighted it could not replace their natural voice or preserve their identity. However, few in either group showed an awareness of how a voice bank is used in AAC, and how communication using AAC is significantly different to natural speech. Conclusions and Implications: This research is the first study of its kind to examine the considerations for decision making around voice banking for plwMND. Preserving identity is central to decision making when considering whether or not to voice bank. However, the reality of using AAC and voice banking for communication is poorly understood. Professionals have a role to provide plwMND with more information about voice banking in the wider context of using AAC for communication. It may be that the process of voice banking itself is seen as a positive act for plwMND, independent of how it is used later. Further research with associated professionals and stakeholders is indicated.

Type: Article
Title: Voice banking for people living with motor neurone disease: Views and expectations
DOI: 10.1111/1460-6984.12588
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12588
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) progressive neurological disorders Motor Neurone Disease ALS Voice and Iden
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10119597
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