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Accumulation of childhood adversities and type 1 diabetes risk: a register-based cohort study of all children born in Denmark between 1980 and 2015

Bengtsson, J; Byberg, S; Carstensen, B; De Stavola, BL; Svensson, J; Jørgensen, ME; Rod, NH; (2020) Accumulation of childhood adversities and type 1 diabetes risk: a register-based cohort study of all children born in Denmark between 1980 and 2015. International Journal of Epidemiology , 49 (5) pp. 1604-1613. 10.1093/ije/dyaa138. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated an association between childhood adversities and type 1 diabetes but have been underpowered and limited by selection. We aim to quantify the effect of accumulation of childhood adversities on type 1 diabetes risk, and to assess whether the effect differs between males and females in a large and unselected population sample. METHODS: We used register-based data covering all children born in Denmark between 1980 and 2015, totalling >2 million children. We specified a multi-state model to quantify the effect of accumulation of childhood adversities on type 1 diabetes risk. The effects of specific childhood adversities on type 1 diabetes were estimated using proportional hazards models. RESULTS: Accumulation of childhood adversities had a quantitatively small effect on type 1 diabetes risk among females [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per adversity increase: 1.07; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.11], but not among males (adjusted HR per adversity increase: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.97-1.03). Females exposed to extreme numbers (7+) of adversities had two times higher risk of type 1 diabetes compared with unexposed females (adjusted HR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.10-3.86). CONCLUSIONS: In an unselected total population sample, we generally find no or negligible effects of childhood adversities on type 1 diabetes risk, which may be reassuring to persons with type 1 diabetes who are concerned that personal trauma contributed to their disease. There is a very small group of females exposed to a high degree of adversity who may have a higher risk of type 1 diabetes and this group needs further attention.

Type: Article
Title: Accumulation of childhood adversities and type 1 diabetes risk: a register-based cohort study of all children born in Denmark between 1980 and 2015
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyaa138
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyaa138
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
Keywords: Life course, adverse childhood experiences, childhood adversities, life events, prospective study, register-based, type 1 diabetes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10119382
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