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The relationship between the home environment and child adiposity: a systematic review

Kininmonth, AR; Smith, AD; Llewellyn, CH; Dye, L; Lawton, CL; Fildes, A; (2021) The relationship between the home environment and child adiposity: a systematic review. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 18 (1) , Article 4. 10.1186/s12966-020-01073-9. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Extensive research has demonstrated the role of the Home Environment (HE) in shaping children’s energy balance behaviours. Less is known about direct relationships with bodyweight. This review examines associations between the social and physical aspects of three pre-defined Home Environment domains (food, physical activity and media) and adiposity measures in children ≤12 years. Methods: Six electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, EBSCO CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycInfo) were systematically searched up to October 2020. Studies reporting at least one physical and/or social aspect of the food, physical activity and/or media domains of the Home Environment in relation to child adiposity outcomes were included (n = 62). Results: Most studies examined one (n = 41) or two domains (n = 16). Only five studies assessed all three domains of the Home Environment. Most consistent relationships were observed for physical aspects of the home media environment; with greater availability of electronic devices associated with higher child adiposity (21/29 studies). Findings were less consistent for the smaller number of studies examining physical aspects of the home food or physical activity environments. 8/15 studies examining physical food environments reported null associations with adiposity. Findings were similarly mixed for physical activity environments; with 4/7 reporting null associations, 2/7 reporting negative associations and 1/7 reporting positive associations between access to physical activity equipment/garden space and adiposity. Fewer studies assessed social aspects (e.g. caregiver modelling or limit setting) of the Home Environment in relation to child adiposity and findings were again mixed; 9/16 media environment, 7/11 food environment and 9/13 physical activity environment studies reported null associations with child adiposity outcomes. Conclusions: The home media environment was most consistently associated with adiposity in childhood. Findings were less consistent for the home food and physical activity environments. Greater agreement on definitions and the measurement of the obesogenic home environment is required in order to clarify the strength and direction of relationships with child adiposity. Robust longitudinal research using comprehensive measures of the holistic home environment is needed to better identify which aspects contribute to excess weight gain in childhood. Trial registration: PROSPERO Systematic review registration number: CRD42018115139.

Type: Article
Title: The relationship between the home environment and child adiposity: a systematic review
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12966-020-01073-9
Publisher version: https://doi.org/http://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-...
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10119012
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