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New Insights on the Role of TRP Channels in Calcium Signalling and Immunomodulation: Review of Pathways and Implications for Clinical Practice

Froghi, S; Grant, CR; Tandon, R; Quaglia, A; Davidson, B; Fuller, B; (2021) New Insights on the Role of TRP Channels in Calcium Signalling and Immunomodulation: Review of Pathways and Implications for Clinical Practice. Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology 10.1007/s12016-020-08824-3. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body and is central to many physiological processes, including immune system activation and maintenance. Studies continue to reveal the intricacies of calcium signalling within the immune system. Perhaps the most well-understood mechanism of calcium influx into cells is store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), which occurs via calcium release-activated channels (CRACs). SOCE is central to the activation of immune system cells; however, more recent studies have demonstrated the crucial role of other calcium channels, including transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. In this review, we describe the expression and function of TRP channels within the immune system and outline associations with murine models of disease and human conditions. Therefore, highlighting the importance of TRP channels in disease and reviewing potential. The TRP channel family is significant, and its members have a continually growing number of cellular processes. Within the immune system, TRP channels are involved in a diverse range of functions including T and B cell receptor signalling and activation, antigen presentation by dendritic cells, neutrophil and macrophage bactericidal activity, and mast cell degranulation. Not surprisingly, these channels have been linked to many pathological conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, chronic fatigue syndrome and myalgic encephalomyelitis, atherosclerosis, hypertension and atopy.

Type: Article
Title: New Insights on the Role of TRP Channels in Calcium Signalling and Immunomodulation: Review of Pathways and Implications for Clinical Practice
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s12016-020-08824-3
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12016-020-08824-3
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Immunomodulation autoimmunity, Immunosuppression, TRP channels, Transient receptor potential channel
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10119004
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