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Expanding the anaerobic digestion map: A review of intermediates in the digestion of food waste

Hunter, SM; Blanco, E; Borrion, A; (2021) Expanding the anaerobic digestion map: A review of intermediates in the digestion of food waste. Science of The Total Environment , 767 , Article 144265. 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.144265. (In press).

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Abstract

Anaerobic digestion is a promising technology as a renewable source of energy products, but these products have low economic value and process control is challenging. Identifying intermediates formed throughout the process could enhance understanding and offer opportunities for improved monitoring, control, and valorisation. In this review, intermediates present in the anaerobic digestion process are identified and discussed, including the following: volatile fatty acids, carboxylic acid, amino acids, furans, terpenes and phytochemicals. The key limitations associated with exploiting these intermediates are also addressed including challenging mixed cultures of microbiology, complex feedstocks, and difficult extraction and separation techniques.

Type: Article
Title: Expanding the anaerobic digestion map: A review of intermediates in the digestion of food waste
DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.144265
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.144265
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: AD, model, valorization, optimisation, product
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Civil, Environ and Geomatic Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118993
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