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Ambulatory management of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax: a randomised controlled trial

Walker, SP; Keenan, E; Bintcliffe, O; Stanton, AE; Roberts, M; Pepperell, J; Fairbairn, I; ... Maskell, NA; + view all (2021) Ambulatory management of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax: a randomised controlled trial. European Respiratory Journal , 57 (6) , Article 2003375. 10.1183/13993003.03375-2020. Green open access

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Abstract

Objective: Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) is traditionally managed with an intercostal chest tube attached to an underwater seal. We investigated whether use of a one-way flutter valve shortened length of patients’ stay (LoS). / Methods: This open-label randomised controlled trial enrolled patients presenting with SSP and randomised to either a chest tube and underwater seal (standard care: SC) or ambulatory care (AC) with a flutter valve. The type of flutter valve used depended on whether at randomisation the patient already had a chest tube in place: in those without a chest tube a Pleural Vent (PV) was used; in those with a chest tube in situ, an Atrium Pneumostat (AP) valve was attached. The primary end-point was LoS. / Results: Between March 2017 and March 2020, 41 patients underwent randomisation: 20 to SC and 21 to AC (13=PV, 8=AP). There was no difference in LoS in the first 30 days following treatment intervention: AC (median=6 days, IQR 14.5) and SC (median=6 days, IQR 13.3). In patients treated with PV there was a high rate of early treatment failure (6/13; 46%), compared to patients receiving SC (3/20; 15%) (p=0.11) Patients treated with AP had no (0/8 0%) early treatment failures and a median LoS of 1.5 days (IQR 23.8). / Conclusion: There was no difference in LoS between ambulatory and standard care. Pleural Vents had high rates of treatment failure and should not be used in SSP. Atrium Pneumostats are a safer alternative, with a trend towards lower LOS.

Type: Article
Title: Ambulatory management of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax: a randomised controlled trial
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1183/13993003.03375-2020
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1183/13993003.03375-2020
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118926
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