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Patient-reported outcomes in young adults with osteonecrosis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip - a longitudinal and cross-sectional evaluation

Marks, A; Cortina-Borja, M; Maor, D; Hashemi-Nejad, A; Roposch, A; (2021) Patient-reported outcomes in young adults with osteonecrosis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip - a longitudinal and cross-sectional evaluation. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders , 22 , Article 42. 10.1186/s12891-020-03865-3. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a common complication in the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). While functional outcomes of affected patients are good in childhood, it is not clear how they change during the transition to young adulthood. This study determined the relationship between osteonecrosis and hip function, physical function and health status in adolescents and young adults. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 169 patients with a mean age of 19.7 ± 3.8 years with and without osteonecrosis following an open or closed reduction (1995–2005). We also performed a separate longitudinal evaluation of an historical cohort of 54 patients with osteonecrosis, embedded in this sample. All completed patient-reported outcome measures in 2015/2016 to quantify hip function (maximum score 100); physical function (maximum score 100); and general health status (maximum score 1). We graded all radiographs for subtype of osteonecrosis (Bucholz-Ogden); acetabular dysplasia (centre-edge angle); subluxation (Shenton’s line); and osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence). Analyses were adjusted for the number of previous surgical procedures on the hip and for the severity of residual hip dysplasia. Results: In 149 patients (186 hips) with and without osteonecrosis, the mean differences (95% confidence interval) in hip function, physical function and quality of life were − 4.7 (− 10.26, 0.81), − 1.03 (− 9.29, 7.23) and 0.10 (− 1.15, 1.18), respectively. Adjusted analyses stratified across types of osteonecrosis showed that only patients with Bucholz-Odgen grade III had reduced hip function (p < 0.01) and physical function (p < 0.05) but no difference in health-related quality of life when compared to no osteonecrosis. Conclusion: Osteonecrosis secondary to DDH is a relatively benign disorder in adolescents and young adulthood. Affected patients demonstrated minimal physical disability, a normal quality of life but reduced hip function.

Type: Article
Title: Patient-reported outcomes in young adults with osteonecrosis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip - a longitudinal and cross-sectional evaluation
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12891-020-03865-3
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12891-020-03865-3
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Developmental dysplasia of the hip, Osteonecrosis, Outcome measures
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118892
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