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Mixed cytomegalovirus genotypes in HIV positive mothers show compartmentalization and distinct patterns of transmission to infants

Pang, J; Slyker, JA; Roy, S; Bryant, J; Atkinson, C; Cudini, J; Farquhar, C; ... Breuer, J; + view all (2020) Mixed cytomegalovirus genotypes in HIV positive mothers show compartmentalization and distinct patterns of transmission to infants. Elife , 9 , Article e63199. 10.7554/eLife.63199. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the commonest cause of congenital infection (cCMVi) and particularly so among infants born to HIV-infected women. Studies of cCMVi pathogenesis are complicated by the presence of multiple infecting maternal CMV strains, especially in HIV-positive women, and the large, recombinant CMV genome. Using newly developed tools to reconstruct CMV haplotypes, we demonstrate anatomic CMV compartmentalization in five HIV-infected mothers and identify the possibility of congenitally transmitted genotypes in three of their infants. A single CMV strain was transmitted in each congenitally infected case, and all were closely related to those that predominate in the cognate maternal cervix. Compared to non-transmitted strains, these congenitally transmitted CMV strains showed statistically significant similarities in 19 genes associated with tissue-tropism and immunomodulation. In all infants, incident superinfections with distinct strains from breast milk were captured during follow-up. The results represent potentially important new insights into the virologic determinants of early CMV infection.

Type: Article
Title: Mixed cytomegalovirus genotypes in HIV positive mothers show compartmentalization and distinct patterns of transmission to infants
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.63199
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.63199
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: genetics, genomics, infectious disease, microbiology, viruses
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118693
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