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Population Pharmacokinetics of Intraventricular Vancomycin in Neonatal Ventriculitis, A Preterm Pilot Study

Parasuraman, JM; Kloprogge, F; Standing, JF; Albur, M; Heep, A; (2020) Population Pharmacokinetics of Intraventricular Vancomycin in Neonatal Ventriculitis, A Preterm Pilot Study. European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences , Article 105643. 10.1016/j.ejps.2020.105643. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

AIM: Intraventricular vancomycin is an effective treatment for neonatal ventriculitis, as the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) vancomycin levels reach adequate concentrations to achieve microbiological cure. There is no robust data on intraventricular vancomycin pharmacokinetics in the preterm population. This pilot population pharmacokinetic modelling study examines the pharmacokinetic behaviour of intraventricular vancomycin in the preterm population of < 28 weeks gestation, to inform the feasibility of future prospective studies. METHODS: The study comprised 8 preterm infants with neonatal ventriculitis (median gestation age 25.3 weeks; range 23.9 - 27.7). Population pharmacokinetics (non-linear mixed effects modelling) were described with one- and two-compartment models to fit plasma concentrations of vancomycin. A CSF compartment was added to the plasma modelling and mass transfer examined. Three covariates (serum creatinine, ventricular index (VI) and CSF protein) were tested on the final model. Area under the curve (AUC) and average CSF concentration (C average) predictions were generated from the final model and compared with time to microbiological cure. RESULTS: A one-compartment model provided the best fit to the data. There was no appreciable transfer between plasma and CSF. None of the covariates provided a significant reduction in the objective function value (OFV). Generally, time to sterilisation with higher CSF AUC (0-24) and C average tends to be shorter, however this should be interpreted with caution as data is erratic. CONCLUSION: This pilot population pharmacokinetic analysis provides important information to warrant changes in the management of intraventricular vancomycin treatment in the preterm population, such as the current use of VI as a dosing parameter. Further study with a larger data pool is necessary to investigate the influence of VI on CSF vancomycin and ascertain dosing strategies.

Type: Article
Title: Population Pharmacokinetics of Intraventricular Vancomycin in Neonatal Ventriculitis, A Preterm Pilot Study
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejps.2020.105643
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejps.2020.105643
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: NONMEM modelling, intraventricular vancomycin, neonatal ventriculitis, preterm pharmacokinetics
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118456
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