UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Automated and semi-automated contact tracing: Protocol for a rapid review of available evidence and current challenges to inform the control of COVID-19

Braithwaite, I; Callender, T; Bullock, M; Aldridge, R; (2020) Automated and semi-automated contact tracing: Protocol for a rapid review of available evidence and current challenges to inform the control of COVID-19. medRxiv 10.1101/2020.04.14.20063636. Green open access

[thumbnail of Braithwaite et al. 2020 - Protocol.pdf]
Preview
Text
Braithwaite et al. 2020 - Protocol.pdf - Published Version

Download (300kB) | Preview

Abstract

Abstract Introduction Traditional approaches to case-finding, case isolation, and contact tracing methods have so far proved insufficient on their own to prevent the development of local epidemics of COVID-19 in many high-income countries despite relatively advanced public health systems. As a result, many governments have resorted to widespread social distancing measures and mass quarantines (‘lock-downs’) to reduce transmission and to prevent healthcare systems from being overwhelmed. However, such measures impose heavy human and societal costs. Automated or semi-automated digital contact tracing, in conjunction with scaled-up community testing, has been proposed as a key part of exit strategies from lockdowns. However, the effectiveness of these approaches to contact tracing is unclear, and to be effective, trusted, and widely adopted such technology must overcome several challenges. Methods and analysis We will perform a rapid systematic review to assess the effectiveness of automated and semi-automated digital tools for contact tracing, and identify key considerations for successful implementation, to inform the control of COVID-19. We will search PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO Medical COVID information portal, OVID Global Health, Cochrane Library, medRxiv, BioRxiv, and arXiv for peer-reviewed and pre-print papers on automated or semi-automated digital tools for contact tracing of COVID-19, another respiratory disease with pandemic potential (limited to SARS, MERS, or pandemic influenza), or Ebola, in human populations. Studies will be eligible if published in English between 1 January 2000 and 14 April 2020. We will synthesise study findings narratively and will consider meta-analysis if ≥ 3 suitable studies with comparable interventions and outcomes are available. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required for this review. We plan to disseminate findings via pre-print, journal publication, through social media and web-based platforms and through direct stakeholder engagement.

Type: Article
Title: Automated and semi-automated contact tracing: Protocol for a rapid review of available evidence and current challenges to inform the control of COVID-19
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1101/2020.04.14.20063636
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.04.14.20063636
Language: English
Additional information: The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Respiratory Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118273
Downloads since deposit
30Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item