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Impact of advance care planning on dying in hospital: Evidence from urgent care records

Orlovic, M; Callender, T; Riley, J; Darzi, A; Droney, J; (2020) Impact of advance care planning on dying in hospital: Evidence from urgent care records. PLoS One , 15 (12) , Article e0242914. 10.1371/journal.pone.0242914. Green open access

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Abstract

Place of death is an important outcome of end-of-life care. Many people do not have the opportunity to express their wishes and die in their preferred place of death. Advance care planning (ACP) involves discussion, decisions and documentation about how an individual contemplates their future death. Recording end-of-life preferences gives patients a sense of control over their future. Coordinate My Care (CMC) is London's largest electronic palliative care register designed to provide effective ACP, with information being shared with urgent care providers. The aim of this study is to explore determinants of dying in hospital. Understanding advance plans and their outcomes can help in understanding the potential effects that implementation of electronic palliative care registers can have on the end-of-life care provided. Retrospective observational cohort analysis included 21,231 individuals aged 18 or older with a Coordinate My Care plan who had died between March 2011 and July 2019 with recorded place of death. Logistic regression was used to explore demographic and end-of-life preference factors associated with hospital deaths. 22% of individuals died in hospital and 73% have achieved preferred place of death. Demographic characteristics and end-of-life preferences have impact on dying in hospital, with the latter having the strongest influence. The likelihood of in-hospital death is substantially higher in patients without documented preferred place of death (OR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.26-1.62, p<0.001), in those who prefer to die in hospital (OR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.60-3.30, p<0.001) and who prefer to be cared in hospital (OR = 2.77, 95% CI 1.94-3.96, p<0.001). "Not for resuscitation" individuals (OR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.37-0.50, p<0.001) and who preferred symptomatic treatment (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.33-0.40, p<0.001) had a lower likelihood of in-hospital death. Effective advance care planning is necessary for improved end-of-life outcomes and should be included in routine clinical care. Electronic palliative care registers could empower patients by embedding patients' wishes and personal circumstances in their care plans that are accessible by urgent care providers.

Type: Article
Title: Impact of advance care planning on dying in hospital: Evidence from urgent care records
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0242914
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0242914
Language: English
Additional information: © 2020 Orlovic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Respiratory Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118272
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