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Biomarkers of response to biologic therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Choida, V; Hall-Craggs, M; Jebson, B; Leandro, M; Fisher, C; Wedderburn, L; Ciurtin, C; (2020) Biomarkers of response to biologic therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Frontiers in Pharmacology 10.3389/fphar.2020.635823. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic inflammatory arthritis of childhood, characterised by various clinical phenotypes associated with variable prognosis. Significant progress has been achieved with the use of biologic treatments, which specifically block pro-inflammatory molecules involved in the disease pathogenesis. The most commonly used biologics in JIA are monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins targeting interleukins 1 and 6, and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Several biomarkers have been investigated in JIA. Aims: To assess the level of evidence available regarding the role of biomarkers in JIA related to guiding clinical and therapeutic decisions, providing disease prognostic information, facilitating disease activity monitoring and assessing biologic treatment response in JIA, as well as propose new strategies for biologic therapy-related biomarker use in JIA. Methods: We searched PubMed for relevant literature using predefined key words corresponding to several categories of biomarkers to assess their role in predicting and assessing biologic treatment response and clinical remission in JIA. Results: We reviewed serological, cellular, genetic, transcriptomic and imaging biomarkers, to identify candidates that are both well-established and widely used, as well as newly investigated in JIA on biologic therapy. We evaluated their role in management of JIA as well as identified the unmet needs for new biomarker discovery and better clinical applications. Conclusions: Although there are no ideal biomarkers in JIA, we identified serological biomarkers with potential clinical utility. We propose strategies of combining biomarkers of response to biologics in JIA, as well as routine implementation of clinically acceptable imaging biomarkers for improved disease assessment performance.

Type: Article
Title: Biomarkers of response to biologic therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fphar.2020.635823
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2020.635823
Language: English
Additional information: © 2020 Choida, Hall-Craggs, Jebson, Leandro, Fisher, Wedderburn and Ciurtin. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis – JIA, Serological biomarkers, imaging biomarkers, Cellular biomarkers, biologics
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Department of Imaging
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118243
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