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Providing culturally sensitive diabetes self-management education and support for black African and Caribbean communities: a qualitative exploration of the challenges experienced by healthcare practitioners in inner London

Goff, LM; Moore, A; Harding, S; Rivas, C; (2020) Providing culturally sensitive diabetes self-management education and support for black African and Caribbean communities: a qualitative exploration of the challenges experienced by healthcare practitioners in inner London. BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care , 8 (2) 10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001818. Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Poor access to, and engagement with, diabetes healthcare is a significant issue for black British communities who are disproportionately burdened by type 2 diabetes (T2D). Tackling these inequalities is a healthcare priority. The purpose of this research was to explore the experiences of healthcare practitioners providing diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) to African and Caribbean adults living with T2D to inform the development of a culturally tailored DSMES program. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with a range of healthcare practitioners including diabetes specialist nurses, dietitians and general practitioners based in primary care in inner London. Thematic content analysis was used to identify barriers and facilitators relating to the provision of effective DSMES. RESULTS: Ten interviews were conducted. There was a strong consensus among healthcare practitioners for the importance of DSMES in T2D healthcare. However, practitioners discussed this area of practice as overwhelmingly challenging and recognized a wide range of barriers that they face. Four themes were identified: (1) The tension between structural and responsive care needs, particularly with growing numbers of patients alongside incentivized targets driving a care agenda that does not meet the needs of diverse communities; (2) challenges posed by cultural beliefs and practices, particularly a distrust of conventional medicine, rejection of body mass index standards and a belief in 'God's will'; (3) building relationships through cultural understanding: insiders and outsiders, particularly the benefits of racial concordance and cultural knowledge/resources and (4) getting the messages across, particularly the need to address gaps in structured education. CONCLUSION: Provision of culturally sensitive DSMES is a challenging area of practice for practitioners, who recognize the need for more training and resources to support them in developing cultural competence. Nonetheless, practitioners recognize the importance of DSMES and are striving to provide culturally sensitive care to their patients.

Type: Article
Title: Providing culturally sensitive diabetes self-management education and support for black African and Caribbean communities: a qualitative exploration of the challenges experienced by healthcare practitioners in inner London
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001818
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001818
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright information © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Keywords: diabetes mellitus, ethnic groups, primary health care, self-management, type 2
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10117733
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