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British Thoracic Society survey of rehabilitation to support recovery of the post-COVID-19 population

Singh, SJ; Barradell, AC; Greening, NJ; Bolton, C; Jenkins, G; Preston, L; Hurst, JR; (2020) British Thoracic Society survey of rehabilitation to support recovery of the post-COVID-19 population. BMJ Open , 10 (12) , Article e040213. 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040213. Green open access

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Abstract

Objective: A proportion of those recovering from COVID-19 are likely to have significant and ongoing symptoms, functional impairment and psychological disturbances. There is an immediate need to develop a safe and efficient discharge process and recovery programme. Established rehabilitation programmes are well placed to deliver a programme for this group but will most likely need to be adapted for the post-COVID-19 population. The purpose of this survey was to rapidly identify the components of a post-COVID-19 rehabilitation assessment and elements of a successful rehabilitation programme that would be required to deliver a comprehensive service for those post-COVID-19 to inform service delivery. Design: A survey comprising a series of closed questions and a free-text comment box allowing for a qualitative analysis. Setting: Online survey. Participants: Multiprofessional clinicians across specialties were invited to take part. Results: 1031 participants responded from a broad range of specialties. There was overwhelming support for an early posthospital discharge recovery programme to advise patients about the management of fatigue (95% agreed/strongly agreed), breathlessness (94%) and mood disturbances (including symptoms of anxiety and depression, 92%). At the time point of 6–8 weeks, an assessment was considered important, focusing on a broad range of possible symptoms and supporting a return to work. Recommendations for the intervention described a holistic programme focusing on symptom management, return of function and return to employment. The free-text comments added depth to the survey and the need ‘not to reinvent the wheel’ but rather adapt well-established rehabilitation services to individually tailor needs-based care with continued learning for service development. Conclusion: The responses indicate a huge interest and the urgent need to establish a programme to support and mitigate the long-term impact of COVID-19 by optimising and individualising existing rehabilitation programmes.

Type: Article
Title: British Thoracic Society survey of rehabilitation to support recovery of the post-COVID-19 population
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040213
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040213
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Keywords: rehabilitation medicine, respiratory medicine (see thoracic medicine)
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Respiratory Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10117409
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