UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Mouse models of atherosclerosis and their suitability for the study of myocardial infarction

Golforoush, P; Yellon, DM; Davidson, SM; (2020) Mouse models of atherosclerosis and their suitability for the study of myocardial infarction. Basic Research in Cardiology , 115 , Article 73. 10.1007/s00395-020-00829-5. Green open access

[thumbnail of Golforoush2020_Article_MouseModelsOfAtherosclerosisAn.pdf]
Preview
Text
Golforoush2020_Article_MouseModelsOfAtherosclerosisAn.pdf - Published Version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Atherosclerotic plaques impair vascular function and can lead to arterial obstruction and tissue ischaemia. Rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque within a coronary artery can result in an acute myocardial infarction, which is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prompt reperfusion can salvage some of the ischaemic territory, but ischaemia and reperfusion (IR) still causes substantial injury and is, therefore, a therapeutic target for further infarct limitation. Numerous cardioprotective strategies have been identified that can limit IR injury in animal models, but none have yet been translated effectively to patients. This disconnect prompts an urgent re-examination of the experimental models used to study IR. Since coronary atherosclerosis is the most prevalent morbidity in this patient population, and impairs coronary vessel function, it is potentially a major confounder in cardioprotective studies. Surprisingly, most studies suggest that atherosclerosis does not have a major impact on cardioprotection in mouse models. However, a major limitation of atherosclerotic animal models is that the plaques usually manifest in the aorta and proximal great vessels, and rarely in the coronary vessels. In this review, we examine the commonly used mouse models of atherosclerosis and their effect on coronary artery function and infarct size. We conclude that none of the commonly used strains of mice are ideal for this purpose; however, more recently developed mouse models of atherosclerosis fulfil the requirement for coronary artery lesions, plaque rupture and lipoprotein patterns resembling the human profile, and may enable the identification of therapeutic interventions more applicable in the clinical setting.

Type: Article
Title: Mouse models of atherosclerosis and their suitability for the study of myocardial infarction
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00395-020-00829-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00395-020-00829-5
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Atherosclerosis, Ischaemia, Reperfusion, Cardioprotection, Myocardial infarction, Mice, Coronary artery, Vascular function
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Pre-clinical and Fundamental Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10116902
Downloads since deposit
25Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item