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The association between plasma metabolites and sleep quality in the Southall and Brent Revisited (SABRE) Study: A cross-sectional analysis

Topriceanu, C-C; Tillin, T; Chaturvedi, N; Joshi, R; Garfield, V; (2020) The association between plasma metabolites and sleep quality in the Southall and Brent Revisited (SABRE) Study: A cross-sectional analysis. Journal of Sleep Research 10.1111/jsr.13245. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

We examined the association between plasma metabolites and abnormal sleep patterns using data from the Southall and Brent REvisited (SABRE) cohort. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provided 146 circulating plasma metabolites. Sleep questionnaires identified the presence or absence of: difficulty falling asleep, early morning waking, waking up tired, and snoring. Metabolites were compared between the sleep quality categories using the t test, and then filtered using a false discovery rate of 0.05. Generalised linear models with logit-link assessed the associations between filtered metabolites and sleep phenotypes. Adjustment was made for important demographic and health-related covariates. In all, 2,718 participants were included in the analysis. After correcting for multiple testing, three metabolites remained for difficulty falling asleep, 59 for snoring, and none for early morning waking and waking up tired. After adjusting for sex, age, ethnicity and years of education, 1 standard deviation increase in serum histidine and valine associated with lower odds of difficulty falling asleep by 0.89-0.90 (95% confidence intervals [CIs] 0.80-0.99). Branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (odds ratios [ORs] 1.19-1.25, 95% CIs 1.09-1.36) were positively associated with snoring. Total cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.97) and high-density lipoprotein (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.81-0.95) associated with lower odds of snoring. In the fully adjusted model, most associations persisted. To conclude, histidine and valine associated with lower odds of difficulty falling asleep, while docosahexaenoic acid and cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein subfractions associated with lower odds of snoring. Identified metabolites could provide guidance on the metabolic pathways associated with adverse sleep quality.

Type: Article
Title: The association between plasma metabolites and sleep quality in the Southall and Brent Revisited (SABRE) Study: A cross-sectional analysis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/jsr.13245
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13245
Language: English
Additional information: © 2020 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: amino acids, difficulty falling asleep, lipoproteins, metabolites, snoring
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10116721
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