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“These people have seen this in our cultures back home”: black mothers in the UK and Canada reclaim attachment parenting

Hamilton, P; (2020) “These people have seen this in our cultures back home”: black mothers in the UK and Canada reclaim attachment parenting. Ethnic and Racial Studies 10.1080/01419870.2020.1828597.

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Abstract

Attachment parenting (AP), coined by American paediatrician William Sears and his wife Martha, claims inspiration from the practices of “traditional” and “primitive” peoples. These peoples’ “instinctive” parenting behaviour forms the basis for AP’s seven tools, including breastfeeding, babywearing and bedsharing. As the AP phenomenon gathers momentum in the US, UK and Canada, this paper examines the raced, gendered and classed dimensions of its rise to popularity. Who is AP for? And to whom does it belong? Drawing from interviews with nineteen black mothers living in Canada and the UK, this paper captures efforts to “reclaim” attachment parenting, both against the Sears and for black communities.

Type: Article
Title: “These people have seen this in our cultures back home”: black mothers in the UK and Canada reclaim attachment parenting
DOI: 10.1080/01419870.2020.1828597
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2020.1828597
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: Attachment parenting, black motherhood, intersectionality, resistance, parenting, intensive mothering
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10116495
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