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The Future's Brighter at the Edges: Modelling and Designs for Efficient Luminescent Solar Concentrators

Portnoi, Mark; (2020) The Future's Brighter at the Edges: Modelling and Designs for Efficient Luminescent Solar Concentrators. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) are fluorescent particle doped planar devices which collect light incident on their large collection faces, and concentrate it to the edges. There, the light can be coupled into photovoltaic devices and converted into electricity. In this thesis I present a series of studies, combining fabrication, characterisation, computational modelling and analytical solutions in order to progress the understanding of, and to increase, the efficiency of LSC devices. The work is structured around a back-bone of an in-house built experimentally verified Monte- Carlo ray tracing platform, which accurately predicts the efficiency and losses of LSC devices. I have extended the modelling platform by integrating a novel time-domain aspect to the simulations, predicting the impulse response of LSC devices. I present experimental verification of these predictions, whilst also demonstrating their application in the context of bandwidth prediction for the use of LSCs as detectors for data transmission in Visual Light Communications. The technique is not limited to this application, as it can provide a deeper understanding of the advancement of LSCs for all applications. Importantly, the modifications are simple to integrate into existing simulation platforms. I have also expanded the model to investigate the effects of curvature on LSC efficiency. Curvature and flexibility in LSCs can expand the range of available applications and fabrication techniques. Here, I demonstrate the potentially detrimental effects induced by curvature as well as the mechanisms behind them. Furthermore, I have provided a potential solution to reduce curvature induced losses by demonstrating a novel, fully flexible, LSC – distributed Bragg reflector combination. I have shown that the all-silicone based design, fabricated using scalable techniques, not only boosts LSC efficiency but also severely decouples the efficiency of such devices from the effects of curvature, paving a route to highly efficient flexible LSCs.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: The Future's Brighter at the Edges: Modelling and Designs for Efficient Luminescent Solar Concentrators
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2020. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Electronic and Electrical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10116282
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