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DNA methylation signatures to predict the cervicovaginal microbiome status

Nené, NR; Barrett, J; Jones, A; Evans, I; Reisel, D; Timms, JF; Paprotka, T; ... Widschwendter, M; + view all (2020) DNA methylation signatures to predict the cervicovaginal microbiome status. Clinical Epigenetics , 12 (1) , Article 180. 10.1186/s13148-020-00966-7. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The composition of the microbiome plays an important role in human health and disease. Whether there is a direct association between the cervicovaginal microbiome and the host's epigenome is largely unexplored. RESULTS: Here we analyzed a total of 448 cervicovaginal smear samples and studied both the DNA methylome of the host and the microbiome using the Illumina EPIC array and next-generation sequencing, respectively. We found that those CpGs that are hypo-methylated in samples with non-lactobacilli (O-type) dominating communities are strongly associated with gastrointestinal differentiation and that a signature consisting of 819 CpGs was able to discriminate lactobacilli-dominating (L-type) from O-type samples with an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.84 (95% CI = 0.77-0.90) in an independent validation set. The performance found in samples with more than 50% epithelial cells was further improved (AUC 0.87) and in women younger than 50 years of age was even higher (AUC 0.91). In a subset of 96 women, the buccal but not the blood cell DNA showed the same trend as the cervicovaginal samples in discriminating women with L- from O-type cervicovaginal communities. CONCLUSIONS: These findings strongly support the view that the epithelial epigenome plays an essential role in hosting specific microbial communities.

Type: Article
Title: DNA methylation signatures to predict the cervicovaginal microbiome status
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13148-020-00966-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13148-020-00966-7
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Keywords: Cervicovaginal microbiome, DNA methylation, Epigenome–microbiome interaction, Penalized regression
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Womens Cancer
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10116151
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