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Extending practical flow chemistry into the undergraduate curriculum via the use of a portable low-cost 3D printed continuous flow system

Penny, MR; Tsui, N; Hilton, ST; (2020) Extending practical flow chemistry into the undergraduate curriculum via the use of a portable low-cost 3D printed continuous flow system. Journal of Flow Chemistry 10.1007/s41981-020-00122-5. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Continuous flow chemistry is undergoing rapid growth and adoption within the pharmaceutical industry due to its ability to rapidly translate chemical discoveries from medicinal chemistry laboratories into process laboratories. Its growing significance means that it is imperative that flow chemistry is taught and experienced by both undergraduate and postgraduate synthetic chemists. However, whilst flow chemistry has been incorporated by industry, there remains a distinct lack of practical training and knowledge at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. A key challenge associated with its implementation is the high cost (>$25,000) of the system’s themselves, which is far beyond the financial reach of most universities and research groups, meaning that this key technology remains open to only a few groups and that its associated training remains a theoretical rather than a practical subject. In order to increase access to flow chemistry, we sought to design and develop a small-footprint, low-cost and portable continuous flow system that could be used to teach flow chemistry, but that could also be used by research groups looking to transition to continuous flow chemistry. A key element of its utility focusses on its 3D printed nature, as low-cost reactors could be readily incorporated and modified to suit differing needs and educational requirements. In this paper, we demonstrate the system’s flexibility using reactors and mixing chips designed and 3D printed by an undergraduate project student (N.T.) and show how the flexibility of the system allows the investigation of differing flow paths on the same continuous flow system in parallel.

Type: Article
Title: Extending practical flow chemistry into the undergraduate curriculum via the use of a portable low-cost 3D printed continuous flow system
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s41981-020-00122-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s41981-020-00122-5
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: 3D Printing . Additive Manufacturing . Flow Chemistry . Reactionware . Fluidics
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Pharma and Bio Chemistry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Chemistry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10115458
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