UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Understanding the reactogenicity of 4CMenB vaccine: Comparison of a novel and conventional method of assessing post-immunisation fever and correlation with pre-release in vitro pyrogen testing

Valente Pinto, M; Davis, K; Andrews, N; Goldblatt, D; Borrow, R; Southern, J; Nordgren, IK; ... Snape, MD; + view all (2020) Understanding the reactogenicity of 4CMenB vaccine: Comparison of a novel and conventional method of assessing post-immunisation fever and correlation with pre-release in vitro pyrogen testing. Vaccine , 38 (49) pp. 7834-7841. 10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.023. Green open access

[thumbnail of Goldblatt_JVAC-D-20-00203 Vaccine resubmission Track changes.pdf]
Preview
Text
Goldblatt_JVAC-D-20-00203 Vaccine resubmission Track changes.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (438kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Better understanding of vaccine reactogenicity is crucial given its potential impact upon vaccine safety and acceptance. Here we report a comparison between conventional and novel (continuous) methods of monitoring temperature and evaluate any association between reactogenicity and the monocyte activation test (MAT) employed for testing four-component capsular group B meningococcal vaccine (4CMenB) batches prior to release for clinical use in Europe. METHODS: Healthy 7-12-week-old infants were randomised in two groups: group PCV13 2 + 1 (received pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 valent (PCV13) at 2, 4 and 12 months) and group PCV13 1 + 1 (received reduced schedule at 3 and 12 months). In both, infants received the remaining immunisations as per UK national schedule (including 4CMenB at 2, 4 and 12 months of age). Fever was measured for the first 24 h after immunisations using an axillary thermometer and with a wireless continuous temperature monitoring device (iButton®). To measure the relative pyrogenicity of individual 4CMenB batches, MAT was performed according to Ph. Eu. chapter 2.6.30 method C using PBMCs with IL-6 readout. RESULTS: Fever rates detected by the iButton® ranged from 28.7% to 76.5% and from 46.6% to 71.1% in group PCV13 2 + 1 and PCV13 1 + 1 respectively, across all study visits. The iButton® recorded a higher number of fever episodes when compared with axillary measurements in both groups (range of axillary temperature fevers; group PCV13 2 + 1: 6.7%-38%; group PCV13 1 + 1: 11.4%-37.1%). An agreement between the two methods was between 0.39 and 0.36 (p < 0.001) at 8 h' time-point post primary immunisations. No correlation was found between MAT scores and fever rates, or other reported adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that conventional, intermittent, fever measurements underestimates fever rates following immunisation. 4CMenB MAT scores didn't predict reactogenicity, providing reassurance that vaccine batches with the highest acceptable pyrogen level are not associated with an increase in adverse events. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02482636.

Type: Article
Title: Understanding the reactogenicity of 4CMenB vaccine: Comparison of a novel and conventional method of assessing post-immunisation fever and correlation with pre-release in vitro pyrogen testing
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.023
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.023
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: 4CMenB, MAT score, Monocyte activation test, Reactogenicity, iButton®
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10115411
Downloads since deposit
121Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item