UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The Evolving Identity and Competence of New Nursing Graduates in Practice: A Community of Practice Perspective

Chen, Mary Xiaorong; (2020) The Evolving Identity and Competence of New Nursing Graduates in Practice: A Community of Practice Perspective. Doctoral thesis (Ed.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
The Evolving Identity and Competence of New Nursing Graduates in CoP_Final Thesis_MaryChenXiaorong6Nov2020.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Novices’ transition is identified as a period of time at the beginning of their professional career, when they go through role changes from students to independent practitioners. The transitional literature indicates novices’ incompetence and difficulties in transition in nursing and other professions. I argue that these findings were based on a fixed model of competent identity, while novices’ transitional mechanism is not well understood. Aiming to examine how transition happens, a focused ethnographic study underpinned by Wenger’s Community of Practice theory was conducted to explore novice nurses’ practice in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. Data was collected using observation over four months and focus group discussions. I identified sociocultural elements indicating the local rules the nurses make reference to in their participation. These elements include the need to assess the situation, to recognise the different characteristics of people and to be able to work with them, to identify and prioritise tasks, and to express and understand one another’s participation. The novices were found to be negotiating meaning and relational positions with different nurses in different situations at different levels, indicating the effect of sociocultural elements on their practice and the formation of community membership identities. The study findings reveal how complex the novices’ workplace and work really are and help us to better understand how competence and membership identity are negotiated among members. I argue that novices’ transitional mechanism is their evolving learning of the workplace and work, and negotiation of membership identity, a necessary part of their professional development. This study extends nursing and wider interdisciplinary literature on novices’ transition to a broader notion of meaning making and identity negotiation among members in practice. The new concepts developed add clarity to Community of Practice theory in understanding members’ negotiation of participation and membership. Implications for policy, education, practice and future research studies are discussed.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ed.D
Title: The Evolving Identity and Competence of New Nursing Graduates in Practice: A Community of Practice Perspective
Event: University College London
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2020. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10115351
Downloads since deposit
126Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item