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Air pollution as a contributor to the inflammatory activity of multiple sclerosis

Cortese, A; Lova, L; Comoli, P; Volpe, E; Villa, S; Mallucci, G; La Salvia, S; ... Bergamaschi, R; + view all (2020) Air pollution as a contributor to the inflammatory activity of multiple sclerosis. Journal of Neuroinflammation , 17 (1) , Article 334. 10.1186/s12974-020-01977-0. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Air pollution has been recently identified as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis. Aim of this study was to investigate the immunological mechanism underlying the clinical association between air pollution, namely exposure to particulate matter 10 (PM10), and inflammatory activity of multiple sclerosis (MS) METHODS: Daily recording of PM10 was obtained by monitors depending on the residence of subjects. Expression of molecules involved in activation, adhesion, and migration of T lymphocytes were tested by flow cytometry in 57 MS patients and 19 healthy controls. We next assessed in vitro the effect of PM10 on expression of C-C chemokine receptors 6 (CCR6) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), on cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDC), and on T cell polarization in PBMC/mdDC mixed cultures. RESULTS: We identified a significant correlation between mean PM10 levels and expression of CCR6 CD4+ T circulating cells in MS patients. This was paralleled by the observation in vitro of a higher level of CCR6 expression on PBMC following treatment with increased doses of particulate matter. Moreover, in mdDC cultures, particulate matter induced the secretion by mdDC of Th17 polarizing IL1 beta, IL6, and IL23 and, in mdDC/PBMC mixed cultures, enhanced generation of IL17-producing T cells. CONCLUSIONS: Ex vivo and in vitro studies support the pro-inflammatory role of PM in MS, by upregulating expression of CCR6 on circulating CD4+ T cells and inducing in innate immune cells the production of Th17 polarizing cytokines. Therefore, we speculate that in MS respiratory exposure to PM10 may induce the production in the lung of autoreactive Th17 lymphocytes and boost their migratory properties through the blood-brain barrier.

Type: Article
Title: Air pollution as a contributor to the inflammatory activity of multiple sclerosis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12974-020-01977-0
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12974-020-01977-0
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Keywords: Adhesion molecules, Air pollution, Multiple sclerosis, Particulate matter, Th 17 lymphocytes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10115178
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