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Systematic review of the role of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in treating malignant lesions of the hepatobiliary system

Sehmbi, AS; Froghi, S; Oliveira de Andrade, M; Saffari, N; Fuller, B; Quaglia, A; Davidson, B; (2020) Systematic review of the role of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in treating malignant lesions of the hepatobiliary system. HPB 10.1016/j.hpb.2020.06.013. (In press).

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging non-invasive, targeted treatment of malignancy. The aim of this review was to assess the efficacy, safety and optimal technical parameters of HIFU to treat malignant lesions of the hepatobiliary system. METHODS: A systematic search of the English literature was performed until March 2020, interrogating Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. The following key-words were input in various combinations: 'HIFU', 'High intensity focussed ultrasound', 'Hepatobiliary', 'Liver', 'Cancer' and 'Carcinoma'. Extracted content included: Application type, Exposure parameters, Patient demographics, and Treatment outcomes. RESULTS: Twenty-four articles reported on the clinical use of HIFU in 940 individuals to treat malignant liver lesions. Twenty-one studies detailed the use of HIFU to treat hepatocellular carcinoma only. Mean tumour size was 5.1 cm. Across all studies, HIFU resulted in complete tumour ablation in 55% of patients. Data on technical parameters and the procedural structure was very heterogeneous. Ten studies (n = 537 (57%) patients) described the use of HIFU alongside other modalities including TACE, RFA and PEI; 66% of which resulted in complete tumour ablation. Most common complications were skin burns (15%), local pain (5%) and fever (2%). CONCLUSION: HIFU has demonstrated benefit as a treatment modality for malignant lesions of the hepatobiliary system. Combining HIFU with other ablative therapies, particularly TACE, increases the efficacy without increasing complications. Future human clinical studies are required to determine the optimal treatment parameters, better define outcomes and explore the risks and benefits of combination therapies.

Type: Article
Title: Systematic review of the role of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in treating malignant lesions of the hepatobiliary system
Location: England
DOI: 10.1016/j.hpb.2020.06.013
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hpb.2020.06.013
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Chemical Engineering
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10114715
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