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The Clinical Relevance of Manometric Esophagogastric Junction Outflow Obstruction Can Be Determined Using Rapid Drink Challenge and Solid Swallows

Sanagapalli, S; McGuire, J; Leong, RW; Patel, K; Raeburn, A; Abdul-Razakq, H; Plumb, A; ... Sweis, R; + view all (2020) The Clinical Relevance of Manometric Esophagogastric Junction Outflow Obstruction Can Be Determined Using Rapid Drink Challenge and Solid Swallows. The American Journal of Gastroenterology 10.14309/ajg.0000000000000988. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (EGJOO) defined on high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) poses a management dilemma given marked variability in clinical manifestations. We hypothesized that findings from provocative testing (rapid drink challenge and solid swallows) could determine the clinical relevance of EGJOO. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study, we included consecutive subjects between May 2016 and January 2020 with EGJOO. Standard HRM with 5-mL water swallows was followed by provocative testing. Barium esophagography findings were obtained. Cases with structural obstruction were separated from functional EGJOO, with the latter categorized as symptom-positive or symptom-negative. Only symptom-positive subjects were considered for achalasia-type therapies. Sensitivity and specificity for clinically relevant EGJOO during 5-mL water swallows, provocative testing, and barium were calculated. RESULTS: Of the 121 EGJOO cases, 76% had dysphagia and 25% had holdup on barium. Ninety-seven cases (84%) were defined as functional EGJOO. Symptom-positive EGJOO subjects were more likely to demonstrate abnormal motility and pressurization patterns and to reproduce symptoms during provocative testing, but not with 5-mL water swallows. Twenty-nine (30%) functional EGJOO subjects underwent achalasia-type therapy, with symptomatic response in 26 (90%). Forty-eight (49%) functional EGJOO cases were managed conservatively, with symptom remission in 78%. Although specificity was similar, provocative testing demonstrated superior sensitivity in identifying treatment responders from spontaneously remitting EGJOO (85%) compared with both 5-mL water swallows (54%; P < 0.01) and barium esophagography (54%; P = 0.02). DISCUSSION: Provocative testing during HRM is highly accurate in identifying clinically relevant EGJOO that benefits from therapy and should be routinely performed as part of the manometric protocol.

Type: Article
Title: The Clinical Relevance of Manometric Esophagogastric Junction Outflow Obstruction Can Be Determined Using Rapid Drink Challenge and Solid Swallows
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.14309/ajg.0000000000000988
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.14309/ajg.0000000000000988
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10114293
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