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Multivalent nanomedicines to treat COVID-19: A slow train coming

Tabish, TA; Hamblin, MR; (2020) Multivalent nanomedicines to treat COVID-19: A slow train coming. Nano Today , 35 , Article 100962. 10.1016/j.nantod.2020.100962. Green open access

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Abstract

The high transmission rate and serious consequences of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic make it challenging and urgent to identify viral pathogens and understand their intrinsic resistance mechanisms, to pave the way for new approaches to combat severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Multivalent interactions are responsible for performing a broad range of biological functions in normal cells, such as cell-cell communication and adhesion. Multivalency underlies the reversibility of ligand-receptor interactions during infections. Previous studies into multivalent nanomedicines used against viruses, have revealed their ability, not only to probe the molecular processes of viral infections, but also to target pathogen-host cell binding with minimal collateral damage to normal cells. Nanomedicines are comparable in size to viruses and to cell receptor complexes (that mediate viral uptake), and can function as safe and accurate armoured vehicles to facilitate the transport of anti-viral drugs. Multivalent nanomedicines can be designed to avoid binding to extracellular serum proteins, and ultimately lead to destruction of the viruses. This brief perspective highlights the potential of innovative smart and safe multivalent nanomedicines that could target multiple viral factors involved in infections at cellular levels. For instance it is possible to target viral spike protein mediated entry pathways, as well as viral replication and cell lysis. Nanomedicine-based approaches could open new opportunities for anti-coronavirus therapies.

Type: Article
Title: Multivalent nanomedicines to treat COVID-19: A slow train coming
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.nantod.2020.100962
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2020.100962
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Oncology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10113964
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