UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Computational modelling of patient specific spring assisted lambdoid craniosynostosis correction

Bozkurt, S; Borghi, A; Van de Lande, LS; Jeelani, NUO; Dunaway, DJ; Schievano, S; (2020) Computational modelling of patient specific spring assisted lambdoid craniosynostosis correction. Scientific Reports , 10 , Article 18693. 10.1038/s41598-020-75747-6. Green open access

[thumbnail of s41598-020-75747-6.pdf]
Preview
Text
s41598-020-75747-6.pdf - Published Version

Download (7MB) | Preview

Abstract

Lambdoid craniosynostosis (LC) is a rare non-syndromic craniosynostosis characterised by fusion of the lambdoid sutures at the back of the head. Surgical correction including the spring assisted cranioplasty is the only option to correct the asymmetry at the skull in LC. However, the aesthetic outcome from spring assisted cranioplasty may remain suboptimal. The aim of this study is to develop a parametric finite element (FE) model of the LC skulls that could be used in the future to optimise spring surgery. The skull geometries from three different LC patients who underwent spring correction were reconstructed from the pre-operative computed tomography (CT) in Simpleware ScanIP. Initially, the skull growth between the pre-operative CT imaging and surgical intervention was simulated using MSC Marc. The osteotomies and spring implantation were performed to simulate the skull expansion due to the spring forces and skull growth between surgery and post-operative CT imaging in MSC Marc. Surface deviation between the FE models and post-operative skull models reconstructed from CT images changed between ± 5 mm over the skull geometries. Replicating spring assisted cranioplasty in LC patients allow to tune the parameters for surgical planning, which may help to improve outcomes in LC surgeries in the future.

Type: Article
Title: Computational modelling of patient specific spring assisted lambdoid craniosynostosis correction
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-75747-6
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-75747-6
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Bone development, Bone remodelling, Computational science
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Childrens Cardiovascular Disease
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10113792
Downloads since deposit
30Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item