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Using behavioural insights to increase HIV self-sampling kit returns: a randomized controlled text message trial to improve England's HIV self-sampling service

Brown, LJ; Tan, KS; Guerra, LE; Naidoo, CJ; Nardone, A; (2018) Using behavioural insights to increase HIV self-sampling kit returns: a randomized controlled text message trial to improve England's HIV self-sampling service. HIV Medicine , 19 (9) pp. 585-596. 10.1111/hiv.12634. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to determine whether behaviourally informed short message service (SMS) primer and reminder messages could increase the return rate of HIV self-sampling kits ordered online. METHODS: The study was a 2 × 2 factorial design randomized control trial. A total of 9585 individuals who ordered a self-sampling kit from www.freetesting.hiv different SMS combinations: 1) standard reminders sent days 3 and 7 after dispatch (control); 2) primer sent 1 day after dispatch plus standard reminders; 3) behavioural insights (BI) reminders (no primer); or 4) primer plus BI reminders. The analysis was restricted to individuals who received all messages (n = 8999). We used logistic regression to investigate independent effects of the primer and BI reminders and their interaction. We explored the impact of sociodemographic characteristics on kit return as a secondary analysis. RESULTS: Those who received the primer and BI reminders had a return rate 4% higher than that of those who received the standard messages. We found strong evidence of a positive effect of the BI reminders (odds ratio 1.13; 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.23; P = 0.003) but no evidence for an effect of the primer, or for an interaction between the two interventions. Odds of kit return increased with age, with those aged ≥ 65 years being almost 2.5 times more likely to return the kit than those aged 25-34 years. Men who have sex with men were 1.5-4.5 times more likely to return the kit compared with other sexual behaviour and gender identity groups. Non-African black clients were 25% less likely to return the kit compared with other ethnicities. CONCLUSIONS: Adding BI to reminder messages was successful in improving return rates at no additional cost.

Type: Article
Title: Using behavioural insights to increase HIV self-sampling kit returns: a randomized controlled text message trial to improve England's HIV self-sampling service
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/hiv.12634
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/hiv.12634
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Keywords: HIV diagnostic tests, behavioural interventions, public health, randomized controlled trial, text messaging, Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Behavior, England, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Reagent Kits, Diagnostic, Reminder Systems, Sexual and Gender Minorities, Text Messaging, Young Adult
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10113062
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