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Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation in childhood: a staged management strategy incorporating manipulation under anaesthesia

Hill, CS; Borg, A; Tahir, MZ; Thompson, DNP; (2020) Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation in childhood: a staged management strategy incorporating manipulation under anaesthesia. Child's Nervous System 10.1007/s00381-020-04727-y. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

AIMS: The aims were to evaluate the safety of manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) for atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) and the relative efficacy of rigid collar vs halo-body orthosis (HBO) in avoiding relapse and the need for open surgery. METHODS: Cases of CT-verified AARF treated by MUA were identified from a neurosurgical operative database. Demographic details, time to presentation and aetiology of AARF were ascertained through case note review. Cases were divided according to method of immobilisation after successful reduction, either rigid collar (group 1) or HBO (group 2). The primary outcome measure was relapse requiring open surgical arthrodesis. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients (2.2–12.7 years) satisfied inclusion criteria. Time to presentation varied from 1 day to 18 months. There were 19 patients in group 1 and 14 in group 2. There were no adverse events associated with MUA. 9/19 (47%) patients in group 1 resolved without need for further treatment compared with 10/14 (71%) in group 2 (p = 0.15). Of the 10 patients who failed group 1 treatment, four resolved after HBO. A total of ten patients (30%) failed treatment and required open surgery. CONCLUSIONS: MUA is a safe procedure for AARF where initial conservative measures have failed. MUA followed by immobilisation avoids the need for open surgery in over two thirds of cases. Immobilisation by cervical collar appears equally effective to HBO as an initial management, and so a step-wise approach may be reasonable. Delayed presentation may be a risk factor for relapse and need for open surgery.

Type: Article
Title: Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation in childhood: a staged management strategy incorporating manipulation under anaesthesia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00381-020-04727-y
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00381-020-04727-y
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation, Subluxation, Torticollis, Paediatric, Halo-body orthosis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Neurosciences Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10112386
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