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Successful Auxiliary Liver Transplant Followed by Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease Type 1

Chartier, M-E; Deheragoda, M; Gattens, M; Dhawan, A; Heaton, N; Booth, C; Hadzic, N; (2021) Successful Auxiliary Liver Transplant Followed by Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease Type 1. Liver Transplantation , 27 (3) pp. 450-455. 10.1002/lt.25898. Green open access

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Abstract

We described a five-year-old boy who presented with acute liver failure of indeterminate aetiology, requiring urgent liver transplant. Post-operative course was complicated by pancytopaenia, hypogammaglobulinaemia and cerebral lesions, histologically confirmed as EBV-driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Genetic testing showed XLP1 mutation, prompting matched-unrelated haematopoietic stem cell transplant to cure his primary immunodeficiency.

Type: Article
Title: Successful Auxiliary Liver Transplant Followed by Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease Type 1
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/lt.25898
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/lt.25898
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Acute liver failure, Liver transplantation, Immunologic deficiency syndrome
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10111709
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