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Diabetes-related distress and daily cortisol output in people with Type 2 diabetes

Bawa, H; Poole, L; Cooke, D; Panagi, L; Steptoe, A; Hackett, RA; (2020) Diabetes-related distress and daily cortisol output in people with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice , Article 108472. 10.1016/j.diabres.2020.108472. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

AIMS: Diabetes-related distress is common in Type 2 Diabetes and is linked with poor diabetes control. However, mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. One pathway that could be involved is neuroendocrine dysfunction, as Type 2 Diabetes is associated with altered diurnal cortisol output. This study investigated the link between diabetes-related distress and diurnal cortisol output. METHODS: 134 people with Type 2 Diabetes provided 5 cortisol samples over the course of a day. Multivariate linear regression models were used to assess whether overall and sub-domains of diabetes-related distress measured by the Diabetes Distress Scale, predicted cortisol parameters (waking cortisol, cortisol awakening response, cortisol slope and evening cortisol). RESULTS: Physician-related distress was associated with greater waking (B = 2.747, p = .015) and evening cortisol (B = 1.375, p = .014), and a blunted cortisol awakening response (B = -3.472, p = .038) adjusting for age, sex, income, body mass index, smoking and time of awakening. No associations were detected for overall distress, emotional, interpersonal or regimen distress. CONCLUSION: Physician-related distress was associated with alterations in daily cortisol output. Longitudinal research is required to understand how physician-related distress is associated with diurnal cortisol patterning over time.

Type: Article
Title: Diabetes-related distress and daily cortisol output in people with Type 2 diabetes
Location: Ireland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.diabres.2020.108472
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2020.108472
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Cortisol, Diabetes-related distress, Type 2 Diabetes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10111483
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