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Brain amyloid and vascular risk are related to distinct white matter hyperintensity patterns

Pålhaugen, L; Sudre, CH; Tecelao, S; Nakling, A; Almdahl, IS; Kalheim, LF; Cardoso, MJ; ... Fladby, T; + view all (2020) Brain amyloid and vascular risk are related to distinct white matter hyperintensity patterns. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism 10.1177/0271678X20957604. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are associated with vascular risk and Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we examined relations between WMH load and distribution, amyloid pathology and vascular risk in 339 controls and cases with either subjective (SCD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Regional deep (DWMH) and periventricular (PWMH) WMH loads were determined using an automated algorithm. We stratified on Aβ1-42 pathology (Aβ+/-) and analyzed group differences, as well as associations with Framingham Risk Score for cardiovascular disease (FRS-CVD) and age. Occipital PWMH (p = 0.001) and occipital DWMH (p = 0.003) loads were increased in SCD-Aβ+ compared with Aβ- controls. In MCI-Aβ+ compared with Aβ- controls, there were differences in global WMH (p = 0.003), as well as occipital DWMH (p = 0.001) and temporal DWMH (p = 0.002) loads. FRS-CVD was associated with frontal PWMHs (p = 0.003) and frontal DWMHs (p = 0.005), after adjusting for age. There were associations between global and all regional WMH loads and age. In summary, posterior WMH loads were increased in SCD-Aβ+ and MCI-Aβ+ cases, whereas frontal WMHs were associated with vascular risk. The differences in WMH topography support the use of regional WMH load as an early-stage marker of etiology.

Type: Article
Title: Brain amyloid and vascular risk are related to distinct white matter hyperintensity patterns
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/0271678X20957604
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/0271678X20957604
Language: English
Additional information: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Keywords: Alzheimer’s, cerebrospinal fluid, cognitive impairment/decline, small vessel disease, white matter disease
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10111474
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